Addressing Anti-Asian American violence: resources

While this blog customarily celebrates Chinese culture as a way to advocate for a broader understanding of our cultural richness, I can’t find myself posting DIYs and recipes––celebrations of my culture––without confronting that my culture is right now not being celebrated, but rather viewed as a persistent virus. Watching surveillance videos of elderlies resembling myContinue reading “Addressing Anti-Asian American violence: resources”

Sticky Business: Worshiping the Kitchen God 祭灶王爷

On the 23rd or 24th of the twelfth month, the most important holiday of the lunar calendar commences in the kitchen, enshrining a color print out with candy and wine. Chinese New Year gathers everyone in the kitchen, not only for the food that it produces but the deity who is in charge of it.Continue reading “Sticky Business: Worshiping the Kitchen God 祭灶王爷”

Laba Garlic 腊八蒜

The 8th of the twelfth lunar month––or this year, January 21–– is known as the Laba Festival, Labajie. While we last year covered the rich bean porridge that often masquerades the breakfast table, a lesser known but highly superstitious delicacy includes jade garlics, aka Laba garlics. Laba Festival precedes Chinese New Year because the temperatureContinue reading “Laba Garlic 腊八蒜”

Nine Nines Countdown Calendar + Free Printables

From December 21 to 23, people abandon their nine-to-five jobs to return home for dumpling soup and table games, celebrating Winter Solstice or the commencement of winter. For ancient Chinese, winter not only brought sore throats and sniffly noses, but represented an illness itself, a glut of boredom and yearning for warmth. Households remedied theirContinue reading “Nine Nines Countdown Calendar + Free Printables”

Festival de Merengue

When asked what she misses most about the DR, my mother brings up mangú breakfasts, the kindship her family built with their neighbor Dorka, and after-school beach culture. She pauses, smiles, and closes her eyes – a familiar sound begins to trill in her head. The tambura sets the beats, the accordion adds the tone,Continue reading “Festival de Merengue”

Towering Jiu Jiu Chongyang Cake

Traditional Chinese superstition feeds a lot of attention onto the seemingly aimless yet highly indicative number nine. According to the Book of Changes or I Ching 易经, “nine” is a lucky Yang 阳 number; nine is also the largest single number, and its Chinese character shares the same pronunciation as “lasting” or 久 jiu. Thus,Continue reading “Towering Jiu Jiu Chongyang Cake”

Beef and Hearts of Palm: Ode to My Taiwanese-Dominican Roots

by Jill Tang, NJ & Santo Domingo For our sixth Holidays All World Round Post, we learn about a holidays foods as rich, unctuous amalgamations of cultural cuisines and values. Yet, as a highly nomadic humans, holiday dishes are often reflections of our cultural dualities––a way for everything to come together, even our cultures. JillContinue reading “Beef and Hearts of Palm: Ode to My Taiwanese-Dominican Roots”

Ghost Month

by hiMe, Vietnamese-Australian refugee For our fifth Holidays All Year Round post, welcome Vietnamese-Australian refugee under the pseudonym hiMe. hiMe was born in Vietnam in the 60s and is of mixed ethnic Vietnamese and Chinese heritage; her father was a former Signal Corps Lieutenant Colonel of the old Saigon regime before the Saigon Fall, while her mother was a children’sContinue reading “Ghost Month”

Mid-Autumn Mooncakes

On August 15 of the lunar calendar, Chinese families make mooncake from scratch or haul metal tins from Costco. While my family usually opt for the latter, we finally tried the seemingly daunting yet highly-approachable recipe for my last Mid-Autumn at home. Mooncakes, just like dumplings, have an architecture. Encased by a simple thin-layer crust,Continue reading “Mid-Autumn Mooncakes”

How Needle-Floating Rituals Bring out Patriarchy Practices in Chinese Holidays

If Chinese had a Valentine’s Day, it would be the Qixi Festival. Based on the legend between the Weaver Goddess and the cowhered––mythology of forbidden love, like that of Hades and Persephone––Qixi Festival provides an opportunity for young unwed women to gather together, worship the Weaver Goddess of love, and compete for dexterity. Qixi isContinue reading “How Needle-Floating Rituals Bring out Patriarchy Practices in Chinese Holidays”